Join Us | Print Page | Sign In
Emerging Fellows
Group HomeGroup Home Blog Home Group Blogs

In a fully digital world will companies still need to account for the environment?

Posted By Paul Tero, Friday, July 5, 2019

Paul Tero a member of our Emerging Fellows program inspects the structure of business and the changing environment in a digital economy. The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of the APF or its other members.

 

There are a number of ways in which companies account for the environment. It could be a seasonal perspective in terms of the variations in goods and services brought to market, another is from an environmental perspective in terms of energy usage as well as production and packaging materials, and a third is from a shareholder and stakeholder perspective in terms of statutory requirements. In recent years the triple bottom line reporting framework has made its way into corporate practices. Where companies, for reasons due either to regulatory compliance or enlightened executives, report on profit, people and planet. That is in addition to their standard financial statements. Organizations are reporting on metrics related to their staff and their impact upon the environment.

 

Building on the acceptance of reporting on more than one performance parameter, there is a nascent movement to embrace the quadruple bottom line. Where this fourth performance parameter is "purpose". Defined as the ethics, culture and desires of the organization. The administrative policies and processes that are established by government bodies, and are used to govern companies and organisations, change over time. Long gone is the notion that business reputation is solely built on a profit and loss statement.

 

Into this governance implication let us now draw two threads of previous thought: the structure of business and the changing environment. First, we know that the process business engages in to make a profit will change in the decades ahead. Pervasive digitisation will drive an increasingly ubiquitous phenomena of process automation and forms of cognitive processing. Limiting the typical set of tasks available for the human workforce to those requiring people skills and/or thinking skills. Secondly, while this trend of digitisation gathers apace the climate and natural environment in which business and the digital economy is beholden to will still be changing. There are two responses to these macro changes. The first, described as a pathway of current and common ambition, is to succeed in humanity having a light footprint on the environment. On the other hand, the pathway of lackluster ambition necessarily leads to outcomes that are less than optimal for all life forms.

 

There is currently a broad acceptance of the concept of a global carbon budget. Therefore, one can envisage that, over the course of the time horizon we are concerned with, this principle of a global budget being established in corporate governance practices. Where economic entities are given a "profile" to work within. Thus, realising a transition from triple bottom line reporting through quadruple to quintuple. That is adding "profile" to the currently recognised profit, people, planet and purpose.

 

With respect to the triple and quadruple bottom line reporting the sense is that these governance outcomes are the result of internal motivations. The result of what the business decides to do. With the "profile" metric, the sense is that the reporting is on the outcomes with respect to the environmental budget that any business is given to work within. This "profile" metric, a response to a set of imposed environmental limits, is relevant to both climate outcomes. Through either an enforced collaboration upon all businesses to ensure a continued light footprint, or a set of rules to limit the damage upon our common habitat.

 

The image of this future for business, the government and the economy is where the operational milieu of business is characterised as an expanse of intensely interconnected entities that are data and computationally rich. Where the description has morphed from being called a digital economy into an intelligence economy. Where the wisdom of the quintuple bottom line enforces the boundaries of all behaviour.

 

In a fully digital world companies will not only need to account for the environment. They will be required to.

 

© Paul Tero 2019

Tags:  digital economy  economics  environment 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

What’s Cash?

Posted By E. Alex Floate, Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Alex Floate, a member of our Emerging Fellows program examines the concept of cash in a global digital economy through his fifth blog post. The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of the APF or its other members.

 

Adam Smith suggested over two-hundred years ago that all money is nothing but a matter of belief. Even with the complexity of today’s economic and monetary systems, it still appears that Smith was right. We believe money has value and that value will be accepted by others. Even commodity-based money systems, such as the gold standard, relied on belief that the commodity is of value and exchangeable for other goods or services. Belief, value and trust is what composes our money.

 

Currently governments serve the function of guaranteeing trust that money is worth the face value printed on it. That as legal tender it is exchangeable for other items of value. This trust and value placed in currencies is based on the belief of the economic and political stability of the country. Some currencies, such as the US Dollar have greater belief entrusted to them and are used more widely than others for both legal and illegal transactions; the USD accounts for more than 85% of currency conversions on any given day. Despite predictions of impending doom of the US Dollar due to quantitative easing during the 2008 recession, those moves by the US Treasury bolster the status of the dollar as it demonstrates the willingness of the government to protect the Dollar based economy.

 

Exchanging money can be simple when the other person is standing in front of you and can be easily handed the preferred legal tender. Try to transact across distance, or with large sums, and gatekeepers to the money will necessarily become involved. These include the treasury that issued the money and create the rules for the currency, the banks or institutions that will carry out the transaction, and the institution that receives or sends the money depending on whether you are the buyer or the seller. 

 

Each of these institutions, in addition to having the mechanisms and expertise to conduct the transaction, are also part of the trust mechanism that ensure the belief in the currency remains intact. However, all these gatekeepers create friction in the system that increase the costs of transferring value. Technology can be key in removing those frictions, but current financial interests who profit from this friction will do their best to maintain the status quo. Smokescreens that create the illusion of digital currency will become more common, but the call will most likely remain for the US dollar to remain the universal currency.

 

But in a global digital economy who will be the new gatekeepers? Though legal tender is the property of the issuing country, value stored in the money is not the property of the government. Value can be exchanged by other means, such as digital currency or credit in exchange for value. A future where Alibaba or Amazon trade in their own currency, with employees and contractors exchanging their value for credits on account, is not that far outside the realm of possible.  

 

A threat to both traditional means of exchanging value and potential new universal currencies are the rise of nationalist and tribalistic movements across the globe. If these movements win out physical and digital borders will become hardened, networks will be splintered, and markets fragmented. In this situation where will innovation come from, and how will value be held and exchanged? Those organizations and individuals with technical knowledge and savvy will be in the best position to navigate and profit from this situation. Those outside of this group may find themselves with either diminished ability to easily transact with the new digital currency or be at the mercy of a new set of gatekeepers, who have ‘digital collars’ instead of white ones.      

 

© 2019 E Alex Floate

Tags:  cash  digital economy  economics 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

In a fully digital economy, will you need the same things as you do today?

Posted By Administration, Monday, May 6, 2019

Paul Tero a member of our Emerging Fellows program thinks that in a fully digital economy we won’t be needing the same things as today, but we will be needing the same types of things. The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of the APF or its other members.

 

We produce goods and services and we trade in those goods and services because we either want them or need them. There is a market for them. But in the decades ahead, in a market of bits rather than of atoms, will we still be using the same things we do today? From a final consumer perspective, will the digital economy of the future be unrecognizable compared to today's economy?

 

Consider the retail sector. Where it’s all about the creation and trade in products for the home, for our relaxation, for our sustenance. Or the business sector, where that same dynamic of creation and exchange can be used to drive innovation, to improve operational efficiency, or to maintain a market profile. Or even the public and the not-for-profit sectors, where those same market mechanics apply. That is, in order to provide services, products are purchased. And where nascent product creators are supported.

 

Reflect too on the structure of this global production and trade system. At over $80trillion dollars, the global economy is broadly comprised of agriculture (primary activity) at 3%, industry (secondary) at 30%, and services (tertiary) at 60%. An important factor in all of this are the sources of government taxation. A third of government revenue is from income, profits and capital gains and a third from taxes on goods and services.

 

Assuming ceteris paribus, in the coming decades you and I will still have need for shelter, for food, for companionship and relaxation. The same argument can be made for business, for government and the third sector comparing the needs of today and tomorrow. Of note, however, is the form through which the need is satisfied. We no longer desire, for example, to take our family in a horse drawn buggy on a holiday to the sea-side, or to join with family and others to around a wireless set listening to the latest play. Nor do businesses require a typing pool for the efficient production of company memos and customer missives.

 

Nowadays digital channels of communication are usurping long establishing temporal forms of connections. Nowadays, micro-targeting of marketing messages is more effective at driving trade in goods and services than legacy mass media. Nowadays, there is a greater level of involvement and transparency with those that are served by the public and third sectors compared to times past.

 

And tomorrow? Through a utopian lens we could see life being further enhanced by digital technology. It could be argued that just like today, where a life stage for an adolescent is marked by receiving a smartphone, that same transition for a teenager in 2050 could be celebrated by receiving their own life-enriching wearable AI tech. A world, for this teenager, where the uncanny valley is no longer a limitation in media and entertainment channels. A world, as teenagers look at the career paths of their parents, that is dominated by the output of firms that have put a high priority on employees with first rate people skills and thinking skills.

 

Likewise, through a dystopian lens, life for that teenager in 2050 could be one that is further controlled by digital technology. AI implants mark the adolescent life transition. Options for entertainment and other daily choices are slanted toward optimal social outcomes. Beckoning career paths are with firms that are aligned with forms of surveillance capitalism.

 

The threads that are common to both scenarios are the changes in social structure and the innate desire to make things easier for ourselves. Over time our social institutions change and the people to which we ascribe status. It could be argued that in recent history major sport clubs and/or political parties have supplanted religious groups as our common social institutions. It could be that the realm of the AI and quantum computing scientist and engineer becomes the new sanctum. A new standard of social acceptance that leads to the erasure of the barrier to all forms personalised AI tech.

 

Regarding the desire for making things easier, the so-called “efficient transaction hypothesis”, witness the smartphone. We embraced it because it made complex or time-consuming tasks (personal transactions) more efficient. It made communication easier, information gathering easier and entertaining easier. A significant factor of human nature that will drive the future acceptance of technologies that we perceive today as pervasive and distasteful.

 

In a fully digital economy we won’t be needing the same things as today, but we will be needing the same types of things. The world of atoms meets our needs today; the world of bits will meet our needs tomorrow.

 

© Paul Tero 2019

Tags:  digital economy  economics  service 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)